Coronavirus (COVID-19) Latest Updates

The EV Revolution

The idea of the public driving an electric vehicle over a traditional car seemed a very distant futuristic vision, but it’s happening right now! To establish the acceptance and popularity in EVs, we have created a guide that distinctly highlights EV growth, the convenience of owning an EV and how organisations and expanded infrastructure has definitely helped to support demand.

According to IEA Global EV Outlook 2020 report, 2.1 million electric vehicles were sold globally in 2019, surpassing 2018! The report also mentions that 2020 and 2021 will be the year that we start to see a more diversified menu of EVs, which will certainly push growing demand and create an even greater transition to eliminate and move away from harmful emissions. But it’s not just the general public who want cleaner air, it’s big corporations too such as Waitrose and John Lewis.

They recently announced their plans to end the use of their 4,800 fossil fuel vehicle fleet by 2030 and have also made plans to use 1,700 electric vans for deliveries in 2021. It is said to save an estimated 20,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide every year. It’s an exciting revelation, especially when taking into consideration the general public’s interest and growing investment into EVs as well.

With this driving demand, the growth of EV charge points has naturally improved too. The latest statistics issued by the Department for Transport suggest that EV charge points have multiplied nearly five times over in the last five years, with 18,265 public EV charging units made available in the UK. The convenience surrounding EVs is becoming quite apparent and we listed some of the positive reasons as to why:

  • EV charge points can be installed in your garage or near your drive and depending on your journey, you could simply charge up at home before setting off.
  • When it comes to the cost of home charging, it will vary, as it depends on the model of the car and your electricity tariff, but typically, a full charge may cost as little as £3.
  • Therefore, your car could cost as little as 2p per mile to run and depending on its size, a home electric charging point can charge your car from flat to full anywhere between 1 and 7 hours, so you can simply just charge overnight.
  • There are definitely more accessible charging stations dotted around the UK and to find them, you can just simply download the Zap Maps app.
  • After the initial installation, you won’t need to make time to fill up, you can stay at home and save up to £1000 a year on fuel.

These incentives are reasons why EVs are growing in popularity and making the switch to electric easier than ever. The Department for Transportation have also recently proposed to add up to £1,500 to the cost of new petrol and diesel cars as a way to encourage a faster switch to EVs. This “feebate” system is certainly an effective way to drive and secure EV growth.

It is evident that the world is reacting, we are now starting to see a big change in public attitudes towards clean transportation and it is promising to see so much is being done to ensure that EVs remain on the up and the need for fossil fuel powered cars become a thing of the past.

 

Looking to purchase an EV? Want to know what it’s like to be an EV owner?
Adopt our Sales Director’s buying strategy when you read: ‘A Real-Life Account of What It’s Like to Travel 50,000 Miles in an EV’

Electric vehicles are a key subsequent to transport systems and SolarCentric’s green enthusiast and Sales Director, John Bloomfield, made what he considered an easy decision when finally switching to an EV. Before undertaking an EV, John addressed several areas for consideration: the range, infrastructure and the amount of available support for breakdowns and fast chargers. John’s experience speaks volumes on how much EV has evolved and developed over the years:

What were your initial steps before investing in an EV?

John: In order to progress my decision, I first of all created a spreadsheet to determine running costs and how this matched my available budget. Initially I was surprised at all the costs involved when it came to an EV.

I soon discovered that these expenses were outweighed by cheaper running costs. For example; in my diesel car, fuel will cost roughly £80 and would get me 500 miles, whereas 500 miles in an EV would cost me a predicted £9.38 when charged overnight using Octopus GO 5p a kilowatt. Even at the more expensive day rate of 15p per kilowatt, my total came to around £28.14, it was then effortless to switch to EV.

In regard to cheaper fuel costs, EVs have very few moving parts, therefore, require a lot less servicing, and another advantage for EVs is that they come with multiple tax benefits. At the time of my switch, the government had just expanded Salary Sacrifice for employees considering EVs. This is a great scheme which enables you to lease an EV and pay for it out of your salary before tax, saving you and your employer money. Since then, the government have announced 0% BIK (Benefit in Kind) on EVs.

Now that you have invested in your EV, have you noticed any other qualities along the way?

John: Having convinced myself that an EV was affordable I proceeded to order my new Tesla, taking advantage of the Salary Sacrifice scheme with the knowledge that owning a car this expensive would now be possible within my budget due to the savings on tax, fuel and services. Once I owned and started driving my EV I discovered that the tyres also lasted longer, and the predicted fuel savings were in fact better because there are plenty of places that have free EV charging points; including hotels, pubs, restaurants and public car parks. 

I have now been an EV owner for 18 months and I have travelled just short of 50,000 miles, I am very pleased to report, all the financial predictions have proved accurate, and due to the amount of places you can charge for free, I have definitely underspent on charging. I have found that I use fast charging facilities a lot less than I anticipated, and I charge overnight at home when my travel is only to my office. Often, I travel more than 200 miles in a day and occasionally I need to charge while traveling between sites. To make better use of my time while charging, I’ll grab a coffee and catch up on emails. 

Once you settle into life as an EV driver, you soon realise that standing at the pump is inconvenient and, in my opinion, a very unsatisfying way to spend your money. 

To summarise, I am very happy with my decision to switch to an EV and even though there is a necessary element of planning before starting a journey, the infrastructure and technology surrounding EVs is improving rapidly and it’s great that there are mobile apps that show locations for chargers.


Loading...